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The Best Maternity Dress

Last updated on October 3, 2022

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Our Picks For The Top Maternity Dresses

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Product Overview
Key Takeaway
 Runner Up

Mother Bee Maternity Ruched Waist Maxi Maternity Dress

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Mother Bee Maternity

Ruched Waist Maxi Maternity Dress

Mother Bee's pretty faux wrap maxi dress is made from a polyester and Spandex blend, with short sleeves and a ruched waist. The material is soft as can be, and you can choose from 40 different looks. You'll want to keep wearing this dress even after baby is born because the top is so convenient for nursing!

Overall Take

Elegant SilhouetteYou'll love how you look in this long dress.

 Also Great

BBHoping Sleeveless V Neck Maternity Dress

BBHoping

Sleeveless V Neck Maternity Dress

Here's a breezy, sleeveless maternity dress made from rayon and Spandex, with a fitted design that flatters your curves without pulling or stretching. It has pleats that provide the added room you need as your pregnancy progresses.

Overall Take

Cool Comfort, Graceful StyleThis dress is so cute that you'll still be glad to wear it after baby is born.

Buying Guide

Pregnant women should prioritize prenatal health care, attend birthing classes and set up their nurseries, but who’s to say that they can’t look great while doing all of this?

The maternity dresses of yesteryear were not necessarily made to be attractive, but today’s styles offer expectant moms plenty of options in every color and pattern imaginable. They are made from lighter materials, provide more stretch and accommodate the body’s changes as the months progress.

Maternity dresses can be much more comfortable than maternity pants because there is more airflow around the legs. These dresses are also easier to put on and take off! The two main categories are loose and form-fitting styles, and while the first group offers more room, the second highlights the baby bump. Choose whichever ones you feel most comfortable in, as both can be quite flattering.

Maxi and fitted maternity dresses can be dressier, but you can add accessories to casual ones to look a bit fancier. You will also find maternity dresses with long sleeves, short sleeves and sleeveless bodices. The lengths also vary; you can get ones with hems that end anywhere from above the knee to the floor.  

As for sizing, maternity clothing sizes are the same as regular clothing. If you usually wear a medium dress, you will likely fit nicely into a medium maternity dress. Sizing is also true for plus-size maternity clothes. Remember that clothing sizes vary by manufacturer, so an XL maternity dress by Company A might be smaller than an XL maternity dress by Company B. That’s why it never hurts to break out the tape measure and check the sizing charts.

What to Look For

  • When shopping for maternity dresses, look for soft, breathable fabrics that have added Spandex for stretch.
  • It’s a good idea to have a variety of short and long maternity dresses for different occasions.
  • Many maternity dresses are sold in a slew of colors and patterns so if you find one you like, buy several.
  • Faux-wrap bodices work well for nursing moms.
  • When choosing your maternity wardrobe, look for pieces that can be mixed and matched with non-maternity pieces. For example, a shorter maternity dress could later pair well with your favorite leggings.
  • Don’t discard those maternity dresses after the baby is born, since it takes time for the body to return to its pre-pregnancy shape. These comfy dresses are also fabulous for new moms!

More to Explore

There was no such thing as maternity dresses thousands of years ago, and in times like the Middle Ages, women’s regular dresses were full enough to wear when expecting. Dresses became more “pregnancy-friendly” in the early 14th century, when styles began to follow the female body more closely. Women also used heavy materials like velvet, aprons and overcoats with lace-up vents in the fronts to conceal and accommodate bumps.

The first recorded maternity dress, which was more of a gown, was called the Adrienne. It had an empire waist and was worn primarily by royalty throughout the 1600s.

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