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The Starry Night Umbrella

Last updated on May 12, 2022

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Our Picks For The Top Starry Night Umbrellas

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Product Overview
Key Takeaway
 Top Pick

Galleria Enterprises Van Gogh Painting Mini Starry Night Umbrella

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Galleria Enterprises

Van Gogh Painting Mini Starry Night Umbrella

Designed to resembled a famous Van Gogh painting, this starry night umbrella truly dazzles. It's made using a sturdy fiberglass frame and has an automatic open and close button for ease of use. It's also compact, making it perfect for storing in a backpack or briefcase.

Overall Take

Great for Art AficionadosThis starry night umbrella arrives in an attractive box, making it an excellent gift for the artist in your life.

 Runner Up

HOSA Windproof Canopy Inverted Starry Night Umbrella

HOSA

Windproof Canopy Inverted Starry Night Umbrella

Protect yourself from wind and rain storms with this attractive starry night umbrella. It features reflective strips around the edges for added safety when traveling at night, as well as a C-shaped handle for a better grip. The umbrella's reverse design is also a plus, as it traps raindrops inside to keep them from dripping onto your floor.

Overall Take

Multiple Colors and PatternsIn addition to the dark blue starry night print, you'll find this umbrella also comes in a choice of sky blue with clouds, pink daisies or peacocks.

 We Also Like

LANBRELLA Reverse Automatic Open Starry Night Umbrella

LANBRELLA

Reverse Automatic Open Starry Night Umbrella

Designed for travel, this compact starry night umbrella folds up nice and small. It opens automatically with just the touch of a button and inverts to prevent water from dripping on your car interior or home flooring. The handy umbrella also wows with its high-quality design, which includes eight secure ribs and a waterproof outer shell.

Overall Take

Most EconomicalThanks to the budget-friendly price tag on this starry night umbrella, you'll be able to afford one for each member of the family.

 Also Great

Repel Umbrella Teflon Coated Canopy Inverted Starry Night Umbrella

Repel Umbrella

Teflon Coated Canopy Inverted Starry Night Umbrella

The first thing you'll notice about this starry night umbrella is the ergonomic handle with built-in grooves for your fingers. Next is the durable fiberglass frame and Teflon-coated canopy, both of which work together to keep you protected from the wind and rain. You can even get the umbrella in red or purple if you so desire.

Overall Take

Keeps Your Car DryThis starry night umbrella is self standing, so you won't need to purchase a separate umbrella holder or a set of hooks for storage.

Buying Guide

Being stuck outside on a rainy day is no fun, especially if you can’t afford to show up at your destination soaking wet. A good “Starry Night” umbrella can get you from Point A to Point B with your hair and clothing completely dry. But there are plenty of things to think about if you’re in the market for an umbrella.

One of those things is wind. If you’ve ever tried to navigate through a rainstorm involving wind, you know a poorly designed umbrella quickly becomes useless. Umbrella manufacturers now realize this and, in an effort to win your business, are finding ways to strengthen their designs to make their products more productive. Look for an “Starry Night” umbrella with extra ribs designed using materials like fiberglass and metal if you’re concerned about wind gusts.

The problem with rainstorms is that you’ll eventually arrive at your destination, which means you’ll need to store your umbrella. Whether that means sliding it into your bag or setting it on the floor, drips will be a nuisance. Some umbrellas have a finish that repels water, which not only reduces the risk of leaks but also makes drying easy. With the right umbrella, you can just shake it a few times and slip it into your bag.

Another way to solve the dilemma is to go with one of the inverted designs that have become so popular in recent years. An inverted umbrella turns the original design completely around, folding inward when you’re finished using it. That means the part of the umbrella that was exposed to the elements is now on the inside, with the much-dryer underside of the umbrella now facing outward. You can then set the umbrella in a corner and wait for it to dry without worrying about drips.

If you’ve gotten used to a push-button open and close on your umbrellas, you may take for granted how easy it is. Those who prefer the automatic-open feature should make sure the mechanism is reliable. With some automatic umbrellas, the button wears out over time, or you have to push extra hard to make anything happen.

What to Look For

  • Dealing with a wet “Starry Night” umbrella once you’re out of the rain can be a pain. Some brands use Teflon, similar to what you probably have on your nonstick pans, to repel the rain. Water rolls right off of it, which means when it’s time to step inside, just give it a shake and you’ll be drip-free.
  • Another way to get around the drip issue is to go with one of the many inverted umbrellas being sold today. These “Starry Night” umbrellas contain the water inside as you pull it downward, keeping the upper part on the inside as the dry outer part takes the outside role. This means you can simply fold it up and set it in a quarter or slide it into a bag.
  • If you’ve ever dealt with the wind turning your umbrella inside-out, you know how frustrating it can be. You need your umbrella to hold up, even in the stormiest weather. Some models use a stainless steel frame to stand up against winds of up to 55 mph. Other umbrellas are made using nine resin-reinforced fiberglass ribs to keep the winds from destroying the accessory when you need it the most.
  • Comfort is an issue with umbrella handles, particularly if you’ll be carrying it for several blocks.
  • If you’re looking for an umbrella you can have with you “just in case,” look for a travel umbrella that is built for portability and weighs under a pound. This type is easy to slip into a tote bag or suitcase when you’re not using them.
  • As convenient as portability is, though, keep in mind that you might sacrifice protection from the elements. Compact umbrellas are best for one person and they may not keep your belongings as dry as you’d like. If you need more coverage, consider an umbrella with a much larger canopy.
  • If you’ve gotten used to an automatic-open umbrella, you may not want to go back. Look for an umbrella that features an automatic open and close. This means you can operate your umbrella using only one hand if necessary.
  • The way your umbrella looks may be important to you. Go with a brand that offers 15 different color options, including pink, red, light blue and yellow.

More to Explore

It may seem hard to believe there was a time when people had no way to cover themselves in the rain, but the first umbrellas were designed for sunshade. Umbrellas first appeared 4,000 years ago as parasols. It wasn’t until China figured out a way to waterproof their umbrellas that they began to use them to keep water away. These early umbrellas were merely paper parasols covered in wax and lacquer. Umbrellas hit the mainstream by the early 1800s, with the first umbrella shop, James Smith and Sons, opening in London in 1830. The shop is still open today and offers repairs and upscale umbrellas, as well as walking sticks.

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